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in the foreign policy in the president's speech. how did you characterize this president's approach to foreign policy? >> i think he doesn't want to deal with it, frankly. a lot of people in this country would agree with him. i think this administration would much rather focus on guns and taxes and other social issues and not deal with the quagmire that is the middle east. the bush years were deep in iraq and afghanistan trying to get between the sunni and shia fight and i think this administration would rather not deal with it. sounds great, but i don't think that's an option because the foreign policy and the rest of the world comes knocking on your door and the way things are heading right now while we would like to ignore it or not i don't think we'll be able to. >> nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel, always good to see you. the invitation is open. i know you're not stateside much, but when you are, come back. >> i look forward to. >> now to what could shape up to be the senate race in 2014, the battle in kentucky. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell will be making a bid fo
and president obama's second foreign policy. plus the bush years could have been known the world according to dick cheney. brit brit explains it all. he's next right here in the war room. [ male announcer ] the exclusive air suspension in the 2013 ram 1500. ♪ ♪ engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ ♪ guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet but they're gonna fall in love get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his experience before this committee. john kerry is introduced by elizabeth warren, john mccain, and hillary clinton. a vote on his nomination by the full senate is expected next week. >> good morning. this hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me ask, as i did yesterday, i ask unanimous consent of returning members to allow prospective member to complete -- participate in today's hearing. if there is no objection, it is so ordered. let me start by saying, you are not at the table yet, senator. we will have you there shortly. wow. let me say, mr. chairman, you are still our committees chaired, deeply humbled to preside over the committee today as we consider your nomination. we are honored to welcome you as the president's nominee for a position you have most deservedly earned. the first time you testifi
and the further of american foreign policy. all have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as a team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it has been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you're a champion of the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv aids to a round the world. fighting crime corruption, drug trafficking, and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, center stage representing the interest of all this from securing our embassies in protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping american security corporation where possible and isolation where necessary as in
relationships on behalf of the presidents and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world. but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and continuing to work with you for the issues that you champion over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of biological weapons, fighting for human rights against hiv/a.i.d.s. around the world. if your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel and through cooperation where possible and isolation where necessary as in the case of iran. of course, it goes without saying that you have truly been a world leader in one of the most consequential issues of our time, climate change. it heartens me to know that you will be our voice to the world. whatever challenges
on the notion he was going to transform the way the u.s. conducted its foreign policy around the world. he then proceeded to double down on some of the greatest successes of the bush administration. if you look at the use of the state secrets privilege or the with the obama administration expanded the drone wars, powered special operations forces from jsoc to join special operations command to operate in countries where the united states is not at war, if you look at the way the obama administration essentially boxed congress out of any effective oversight role of the covert aspect of u.s. foreign policy, what we really have is a president who has normalized for many, net -- many liberals, the policies they once opposed under the bush and ministration. this has been a war presidency. yesterday as president obama talked about how we don't need a state of perpetual war, multiple u.s. drone strikes in yemen, a country we are not at war with, where the u.s. has killed a tremendous number of civilians. to make, most disturbing about this is john brennan, who really was the architect of this dro
to be another case where the term becomes almost defined by what's happening abrd by foreign policy? >> i don't think so. i think that -- i mean, the big thing is the deficit and that is something that he needs to tackle. and if he can get a balanced agreement where you have, you know, on a sustainable basis, not just in this short-term, but in the medium and long-term within reduction in expenditure and some increases in taxes, i think that would be good. on the other hand, you have the gun control question which is another big domestic issue which is going to to drain a lot of his political capital, but which he's decided to get stuck into and i don't think there's any retreat from that now. >> final question, do you expect there to be a grand bargain, yes or no, this year or during his second term when it comes to deficit and debt reduction? >> i do expect it in his second term, yes. >> pippa? >> i don't. >> okay. more skepticism about it, but we like your optimism. maybe they will be inspired to come to some sort of agreement. stay there, both of you. next, we'll bring you the latest on a
in the president's attitude, certainly in his approach to foreign policy. you'll recall from the beginning of administration, the word engagement was, in fact, a guidepost for how we were going to try to deal with adversaries as well as in terms of how you try to deal with resolving conflict. so, i think engagement as such is not new. there's als been a premise to that engagement. it's engagement without illusion. the president has looked at iran as a country that is pursuing a nuclear weapons capability and he's made it clear his objective is to prevent that, not to live with it. his preferred approach is to resolve it through peaceful means, resolve it by engaging with iranians, getting ourselves and others to engage, but to get the iranians to change their objective. the end result may be preferably achieved through diplomacy but the implication is if diplomacy does not work, force may be likely. >> you listen to what the president said in terms of interpretation from israel, couple with what ma hud barack was saying, if that kind of back-channelling doesn't work. are we at odds with is
hearing these. >> if she wants this job, it will be interesting. on foreign policy, president obama defending himself from critics who say the u.s. has not been aggressive enough in using american power abroad. >>> well, moammar gadhafi probably does not agree with that assessment, or at least if he were around he would not agree with that assessment. when it comes to egypt, if it had not been for the leadership we showed, you might have seen a different outcome there. but also understanding that we do nobody a service when we leap before we look. here is a classic example of where our involvement, we want to make sure that not only does it enhance u.s. security but also that it is doing right by the people of syria and neighbors like israel that are going to be profoundly affected by it. and so it's true sometimes that we don't just shoot from the hip. >>> secretary clinton's last day at the state department will be this friday. >>> we have new developments on immigration reform. a bipartisan group of eight senators say they've reached an agreement on sweeping legislation that incl
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
the republicans on a whole host of issues including republican staple issues like taxes and foreign policy she does better. it's not enough to go into communities they've ignored or tinker with their message. they have to take a hard look at policies they've embraced, like self-deportation for immigration reform. i don't care how you spin that, hispanics are not going to embrace you if you have a policy like that in your party. >> rick: ron? >> i have to tell you i think president obama is going to help republicans out because he's now unveiled a liberal agenda that, since he has been reelected, surprise, surprise and republicans will be able to contrast themselves as a much morecentric party than the president is going, way left and i think on issues like, climate change, on spending, on, you know, creating a culture of dependence on the federal government, we can help to drive a wedge between senate democrats who are in red states up in 2004, we can drive a wedge between them and focus first on getting back the senate before we go after the presidency. >> rick: doug, what about that? this wa
might have climate change, the foreign policy or restructuring of america's place in the world. prams leading from the back as he said in stern phases rather than the front. i'm in favor of that. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about it and will tackle it this year. there's common sense agreement out in the states how to do it. i think you'll see the president work passionately across party lines on education to make our k through 12 system the best in the world like our university system is. you hit the biggest one and that's economy. we have to continue to take steps. >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> talks about education is if we're going to be competitive, we have to do a better job on education. we've got to control our energy in the future. we've got to develop new sources of energy. we've got to invest in research and development and stay on the cutting edge of innovation. all these things are an sbintegl part of develo
. economy, obviously. you might have climate change. >> right. >> the foreign policy, the restructuring if you like of america's place in the world, taking on where barack obama has taken it so far. very interesting. perhaps leading from the back as he said in certain cases rather than from the front. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about we'll tackle this year. everyone out there understands our system is broken. and we need some fundamental restructuring of it. right thing to do. there's common sense agreement out in the states on how to do it. people putting politics aside. i think you will see the president in the second term work passionately across party lines on education to make the k-12 system the best in the world like the university system is. you hit the biggest one, that's the economy. we have to continue to take the steps -- >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> as a government -- >> talks about education, it is axiomat
on jobs and on foreign policy, making america stronger in trade and national security. >> the way you talk it makes it sound as if we don't have a really divided congress. talking to people on both sides pretty much every day of my work day. >> nothing worthwhile is easy and every inch of ground the president has to gain. but a lot of wind at his back right now and i won't say he will do lay-ups, but this president delivered through his first term. he has been able to do a lot in the first term. the second term will be a good one. >> do you think we'll hear in the inauguration address that talks about that? will you hear -- they told us, unity and hopeful. that's about it. but do you think you will hear -- he will talk about reaching out an olive branch to republicans? >> this is a republican i have heard talk about the importance of america americans to step up. democracy is not a spectator sport. he needs all of us to be involved. all of us need to step up and play a role in the destiny of our country. in the end of the day, this is one of the greatest speakers we have seen in my generat
of staff. he has advised the president on foreign policy for nearly a decade, serving as the president of beauty national security advisor. -- deputy national security advisor. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states accompanied by esther jacob lew and mr. denis mcdonough. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. please, everybody, have a seat. good afternoon, everybody. welcome to the announcement of one of the worst kept secrets in washington. as president, i rely on a team of men and women here at the white house every day. i rely on my chief of staff to keep up with them and our entire government. making sure we are moving in the same direction. making sure that my priorities are being carried out in our policies are consistent with the commitments i have made to the american people and we are delivering progress to the american people. i could not be more grateful to jack lew for his amazing service first as our omb, then at the state department, and ultimately as my chief of staff. as he prepares for his confirmation hearings and the challenge of meeting our treasu
. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, our, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. [laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism,
foreign policy is also defined by food security, energy security, humanitarian assistance. it is define by leadership on life threatening issues like climate change. liz: washington watchdog say this could cost taxpayers a bundle. we have weber and lindsey here. phil, start with you, make your case. >> well, if you look at what his predecessor, hillary clinton, did in copenhagen, with a million a year in global warming, never made process, moving that domestically to get the funding for that. there's been a lot of secret treasury documents talking about a carbon tax. the president is coy about a carbon tax, but at some point, there's going to be a push for that in order to fund international transfers, and there's a secretary of state nominee who says it's the number one top priority, and it's been the focus of the coverage here in the beltway that this is a signal where the administration wants to go. liz: i think there's a lot to say about that. what do you think? >> well, it's about time the leader of the free world led on the topic frankly. like it or not, climate scientists do say
and the opportunity i see for us. if this were a foreign policy speech, i think we'd call it the obama doctrine. it was the firmest commitment we've seen to a progressive agenda and that's why the liberal community is singing hosanas and there are views coming in from the liberals that were holding back and saying, he almost declared war. this was not about unity. this is what i want to pursue. >> but jessica, if this is about who he is, i assume -- does he, i guess let me pose it as a question. is it more important to be successful or lay out those principles where they are talking about gun control, immigration perhaps would have common ground, gay rights. he's picking some fights with the conservative republicans who still control the house. >> he -- obviously he wants to succeed. i think this was an action speech and what he was doing was going -- building on what david was saying, he was calling on his supporters to what we've heard lobby congress from the outside and picking up on what we were talking about earlier with this message about equality and the gay rights movement, that is his
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
. winnie stachelberg will join us. and president obama posing foreign-policy -- president obama's foreign-policy with max boot. and workplace speech laws were guarding social media. is the guest.ear >> finance started in the 1930s. it is really a spinoff as a self help. the 1930s is known for everything from the hard economic times to the 1930s, easy everything from alcoholics anonymous to getting rich to various social activists movements. fascism and communism start to be a big deal. porter develops personal finance. her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it is very much of its time, an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn these skills, we will all be ok. >> the dark side of the financial industry with helaine olen. like us on facebook. c-span, created by american cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your tv provider. >> secretary of state hillary clinton was questioned about the september 11 attacks about that u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya. a u.s. ambassador died in that attack and three
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
agree on a lot of issues, especially when it comes to foreign policy. i am told that they have a lot of trust in each other at this point in time. and interestingly, martin, i'm also told that they both share a sense of humor. that often when they're together, they will crack jokes, make each other laugh, make others in the room laugh that are around them. it will be interesting to watch that interview. it comes amid a lot of speculation about whether secretary clinton will run for office in 2016. certainly an interesting photo-op. but a lot of people will be watching to see how they interact. >> kristin, you go back inside and get warm. thanks so much, kristin. >>> next, let's get all wonky on paul ryan's latest budget talk. let's do it. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. or treat gas with thes
republican friends to be fair. i used to put republicans because i would trust them or on foreign policy. i think anybody who is fair and would look at the president's record -- he has done a wonderful job of advancing our interests as well as protecting us. once again, thank you 4 c- span.org so much. i am enjoying the coverage. host: naomi tweets in -- the metro stations here are very crowded. as we mentioned, metro is planning a rush hour schedule, which means a train every five- six minutes at every station throughout the day because of the large crowds. about 800,000 is the current estimate, to attend the inauguration wendy is on american calling in from sydney, australia. good afternoon, good evening, good morning to you. caller: it is good evening here. host: are you watching online? caller: i am watching on tv, on cable. i spent a good portion of my adult life here, but i am constantly reading -- reading the news about the state. i still consider myself a think sometimes my perspective gives me a broader vision. i can see the discord, the downside of what has been happening, but i c
another must be equal as well. >> reporter: foreign policy absent from his address, though he heralded the end of a decade of war, and touted the economy. >> the commitments we may teach each other, these things do not sap our nation, they strengthen us. >> reporter: the president mostly refrained from partisan jabs but appeared to single out his former gop opponent mitt romney with this line. >> they do not make us a nation of takers. ♪ >> reporter: filling the air with patriotism, the voices of kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ >> reporter: there was a poem and prayers. as he left the front of the capitol, a nostalgic president turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: before the president gets back to work, he heads to the washington national cathedral for an interfaith service for prayers to be offered up for the country and the president. it's a tradition that dates back to fdr. soledad. >> dan lothian, thank you. for the night and parties at night, really party mode in the nation's capital, while
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)